Mirror Website: Majority back gay marriage laws

Majority back gay marriage laws – except for those who support UKIP

The latest People’s Panel poll in the lead-up to the General Election reveals that a majority of all other party supporters backed the change in the law

Cameron vindicated: Majority back the change in the law allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry

Six in ten Sunday People readers back the change in the law ­allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry.

The latest results from the People’s Panel, which is letting you have your say on key issues every week in the run-up to the May 7 polls , also reveal 33% of you strongly support the move.

It was most popular among ­women with 69% in favour ­compared with 50% of men.

UKIP voters were alone among the major parties in having more readers opposing the change than backing it – a vindication for David Cameron, who stuck his neck out to give same-sex couples the same rights as heterosexual ones.

People's Panel. Pictured - To what extend do you support or oppose the law change allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry?
People’s Panel. Pictured – To what extend do you support or oppose the law change allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry?

One reader said: “There are more important things for the Government to deal with than gay and lesbian marriages.”

Another added: “Everyone should have a chance of happiness.”

As the People’s Panel focused on equality this week, it also emerged that more than three in five readers believe 16 should ­remain the age of consent – ­although 14% said it should be raised to 18, as in Turkey.

People's Panel. Pictured - What should the UK age for consent for sex be?
People’s Panel. Pictured – What should the UK age for consent for sex be?

More than six in ten want to keep the voting age at 18 and only 7% thought it should be lowered to 17, and 1% to 15. Some 18% favour 16, as ­proposed by Ed Miliband.

The Labour leader was ­persuaded to press for a change by the high turnout of 16-year-olds in last year’s Scottish referendum.

38 days 22 hours 27 minutes 37 seconds

He felt that having been given the right to vote once, 16 and 17-year-olds should not be denied it in future. The voting age was lowered to 16 for local elections in the Isle of Man, and Channel Islands Jersey and Guernsey.

In the US, 19 states allow 17-year-olds to vote in primary elections as long as they will be 18 on polling day.

In Japan the voting age is 20 and in Italy it is 25 for Senate elections.

People's Panel. Pictured - What should be the minimum voting age for general elections?
People’s Panel. Pictured – What should be the minimum voting age for general elections?

More than half of the People’s Panel did not feel governments have gone far enough in closing the gender pay gap. That rose to 65% among women voters.

A third of the 18-54 group, ­compared with 15% of the 55-plus, felt changes needed to bring about equality have been made.

One reader told us: “Women should be paid the same as men – but nurses should be paid more.”

Regarding childcare provision, only one in ten thought it should fall to mothers alone

Nearly one in three felt it should be shared equally with nine per cent more men holding that view than women. But more than half said divvying up childcare should depend on the circumstances of the parents..

People's Panel. Pictured - How should childcare be divvied up between fathers and mothers?
People’s Panel. Pictured – How should childcare be divvied up between fathers and mothers?
Equality polls. Pictured - Have governments done enough in the past 10 years to secure genre pay equality
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