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Traditonal Values – is there such a thing?

Now I know that quoting Wikipedia is so blase, however in this case I feel the definition is worth looking at:  Wikipedia defines “Traditional Values” as “those beliefs, moral codes, and mores that are passed down from generation to generation within a culture, subculture or community.”

However on investigation, Wikipedia cannot define where those beliefs, moral codes etc come from.  There is no defining text, and what is also interesting is that this cultural phenomena is wildly held as fact, when even within family to family said ideas can be wildly different.

A colleague of mine, put his thoughts as:

Clearly this moron hasn’t heard of New Orleans – though as it is French / Irish / Italian Catholic maybe he is going to allow it to secede from the secession.
I will always respect another’s opinion, however for it to be acceptable it must be rational, and have at least a modicum of intelligent thought behind it.  Mr MacKinnon has obviously not given this a deep enough thought process,  as indeed we could say the same about his previous boss President Reagan with some of his actions and speeches.  For Mr MacKinnon to say that ‘marriage equality’ is such a threat to personal liberty that states should risk a second civil war to preserve the right to discriminate against people, only goes to show how bigoted he is and how he has failed to research and understand  that society has never stood still, it has always moved forward, and always will
Further reading:

 

Whose Values?

A right-wing author has a plan for people who aren’t happy about shifting attitudes about LGBT rights.

Source: Conservative author wants states to secede over gay rights | MSNBC

How to Break the Bullying Cycle

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gay bullying

Author Jonathan Fast discusses his book Beyond Bullying and the danger of ‘gay-neutral’ school policies.

 

Jonathan Fast knows what it’s like to be bullied. As a chubby 8-year-old in summer camp, he was tormented by an athletic boy who broke his arm. Even his father, Spartacus author Howard Fast, was bullied by the House Committee on Un-American Activities for being communist in the 1950s.

In his powerful new book, Beyond Bullying: Breaking the Cycle of Shame, Bullying, and Violence, 67-year-old Dr. Fast takes an unhurried look at the shame underlying violence towards LGBT and straight folks alike. “With this book, I hope readers will be better equipped to deal with bullying of every sort,” he explains, while speaking at his Yeshiva University office. “With time, we’ll be moved, if only by a single degree, closer toward a place where all people are equally valued and respected.” Fast spoke about the danger of “gay-neutral” school policies, fighting back, and whether or not there’s a “cure” for bullying.

Out: Did being harassed as a kid inspire this topic?

Jonathan Fast: In my last book, Ceremonial Violence, about school shootings, a detail was missing about the Columbine killers and other perpetrators. At a conference I heard a talk about shame, and had an epiphany: I realized these vicious guys were carrying huge amounts of that primal emotion. Most likely they were disappointing their parents, not gainfully employed, having trouble socially. Why turn to school shooting? Because they couldn’t express their shame if they wanted to appear mature, powerful, and successful. It’s taboo even to talk about this feeling because it’s associated with little children, weakness, and failure. Ultimately it comes out of their guns.

Gays have been bullied for decades. But during Stonewall, they fought back. Is rioting a useful reaction to feeling oppressed?

It’s a common form of shame management when the feeling is intense, shared by a lot of people, and there seems to be no other peaceful means of managing it. Rioters are usually unaware of their motivations beyond a general sense of rage and frustration. While neighborhoods may be damaged and community members hurt, the events draw attention to grave social problems. Stonewall created a milestone for the gay rights movement and empowered a subculture.

How have LGBT individuals dealt with society’s violence toward them?

Some choose to use their fists, which yields mixed results. Jamie Nabozny invoked the law. In 1988, after coming out in his Wisconsin middle school, he was repeatedly tortured by classmates. The problem persisted into high school. He sued both principals, staff members, and the school district for neglecting to protect him. Lambda Legal came on board, pushing the case into the headlines. A partner at the white shoe law firm Skadden Arps offered his services pro bono. The jury found the school administrators liable for failing to stop antigay violence against Nabozny, who won a 1 million dollar settlement.

In Minnesota, two young women responded with social action. A romantic couple in high school, they’d heard about a series of local gay teenagers killing themselves and wanted to bring visibility to non-traditional gender roles. They got elected to a 12-member Royal Court, and were set to walk in a public ceremony. But days before the procession, a teacher told them their plan was unacceptable because they were two women. They contacted the National Center for Lesbian Rights and the Southern Poverty Law Center and battled against the school leadership. Ultimately they won the right to proceed on the red carpet, to wild cheers and applause.

Regarding that group of suicides, you point to education policies as potential culprits. One high school had written a mandate for faculty and staff to show respect for all students, and to remain neutral on matters regarding sexual orientation. It led to a spate of teen suicides over two years. What went wrong?

A lot. The 2009 recession hit that suburb hard. Residents bought big houses and got caught with giant mortgages. Middle class folks became homeless, living in their cars. Kids were told not to speak about their depression and lack of cash. So they couldn’t manage their shame. To begin with, adolescents aren’t working with a full biological deck. The frontal lobe—the part of the brain that analyzes consequences—doesn’t mature until age 25. Influenced by their peers, teens often make poor choices.

Add to that mix a poorly worded edict that bans any reference to homosexuality, spearheaded by conservative parents. It silenced the few gay teachers who’d acted as a support network for kids coming out. Trying to be neutral, one school psychologist took down the picture of her partner on her desk. Youngsters stopped hearing “it gets better.” All these things contributed to hidden shame, which you tend to turn inward, resulting in acts like cutting, and in this case, a cluster of suicides.

The ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy in the U.S. military has been repealed. Marriage equality is the rule of law. But in one study, 95% of gay adolescents reported feeling separated and emotionally isolated from peers because of their sexual orientation. Around 50% of gay adolescents have experienced physical violence by family members. Research has shown that LGBT teens attempt suicide four times more frequently than their heterosexual peers. When will this trend reverse?

It’ll take another generation to change. I grew up in a homophobic home and my father was an intellectual. He’d say a great writer would never be gay, because they couldn’t relate to the basic human experience. Which was absurd. But when you’re a little kid and your father is a celebrated author, you tend to believe him.

In 1963 the New York Times published an article “Growth of Overt Homosexuality in City Provokes Wide Concern.” Its title reflected the opinion of the Times and the times. I see it getting better with my grown kids.

We all carry shame at times. What are healthy ways to deal with it?

Write about it. Express yourself through art. The film The Gift is a good example. It’s about a teenage bully who grows up and doesn’t understand why in high school his target complained about getting beat up. After all, the bully had been abused by his own dad, but believed he’d sucked it up. Of course, instead of sucking it up, the roughneck had displaced his pain and trounced his victim.

Other ways to deal include going to confession, if you’re Catholic. Volunteering. Doing a good deed. The “It Gets Better” campaign is a great example.

Is there a cure for bullying?

No. We have endless examples of maltreatment of people in politics—think Donald Trump—and in media, like certain newscasters. We live in a bullying society. We have the highest homicide and incarceration rate, and the worst income division, which is a big shame factor. Believing that society is a meritocracy can be humiliating to a lot of people. They imagine success yields happiness. But if prosperity is unattainable, people take that personally. They feel ashamed, and unhappy. Sometimes the shame is turned outward, which is how we get bullies

Openly gay footballers would get respect – Richard Scudamore

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Gay footballers would be treated with respect if they choose to publicly reveal their sexuality, says Premier

Richard Scudamore

League boss Richard Scudamore.

“The environment would be entirely suitable for them to come out,” Scudamore told BBC Newsnight.

There have been no openly gay male footballers in England since former Norwich striker Justin Fashanu in 1990.

The Daily Mirror  has reported that two top-flight players are set to come out with support from their clubs.

“It would be welcomed and I think there would be a tolerance to it. I think the time would be right to do that,” Scudamore added.

Former England women’s captain Casey Stoney was the first active footballer to come out in England since Fashanu in February 2014.

Former Aston Villa midfielder Thomas Hitzlsperger publicly revealed his homosexuality in 2014, after his retirement, and Scudamore is “absolutely sure” there are gay players in England’s top flight.

“It would be very strange if there wasn’t,” the Premier League chief executive said.

In other sports, high-profile athletes have openly spoken about their sexuality, with Olympic diver Tom Daley revealing in December 2013 he was in a relationship with a man.

British race walker Tom Bosworth became the first Team GB athlete to come out as gay, while former British and Irish Lions captain Gareth Thomas, who played rugby for Wales in both codes, and rugby league player Keegan Hirst have also come out.

Examples in football are less common. In 1990, former England Under-21 international Fashanu was the first professional footballer in Britain to come out as gay. He retired from football in 1997 and took his own life a year later, aged 37.

Swedish footballer Anton Hysen, son of former Liverpool defender Glenn Hysen, announced his sexuality in an interview with a Swedish football magazine in 2011.

In February 2013, former United States and Leeds United winger Robbie Rogers said he was gay in a post on his website.

Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger said last year a gay Premier League footballer may never be able to reveal his sexuality during his playing career because of the intense scrutiny he would be under.

And retired basketball star John Amaechi, the first NBA player to come out, has called football “toxic” for gay people and minorities.

Equality is for Everyone

Editorial:  The difficulty when you review articles at any time, is to have balance.  It becomes even more of a problem when you are based in Northern Ireland and you are looking at an article which relates to an election issue in Souther Ireland but is of interest to readers who will be voting in Northern Ireland.  In this case I refer to an article entitled

New effort to turn Irish gays into “untouchable unmarried eunuchs”

written by  and published in Irish Central.  The article is about the ‘no campaginers’ current campaign on marriage equality and why it is against children if you vote ‘yes’.

Just after reading this article I then was referred to Ms Susan-Anne White stance on the LGBT community, which we have already comment on.

The subject of equality is being lost in the rhetoric, equality means:

the state of being equal, especially in status, rights, or opportunities

Rosie Winterton wrote, “Everyone has a stake in creating a fair society because fairness is the foundation for individual rights, a prosperous economy and a peaceful society. Fairness and equality are the hallmarks of a modern and confident society. ”

We urge you to think carefully before you vote, to check your candidates history in relation to LGBT topics, and also the candidates party.

Remember your vote, along with everyone else who votes, will put the politicians who will run our country and also our institutions into power for five years.

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